Events

When:

Monday, May 1
10:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.

Where:

University Center
 
 
Tagged: College of Arts and Sciences, Robert B. Willumstad School of Business, Ruth S. Ammon School of Education, Levermore Global Scholars, College of Nursing and Public Health, School of Social Work, Collaboration Project, Student Affairs, Multicultural Affairs, African, Black and Caribbean Studies, Asian Studies, Criminal Justice, Department of Art and Art History, Department of Communications, Department of Dance, Department of History, Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Department of Music, Department of Philosophy, Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology, Department of Theatre, International Studies, Peace Studies Program, Office of International Student Services, Global, Curriculum and Instruction, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Adelphi Votes, Racial Justice Matters, Diversity

100 Days of the Presidency Conference

Event


This event’s mission is to examine the President’s first 100 days, exploring the scope of President Trump’s platform with regard to health care, immigration, social services, education, the environment, military spending and action, the criminal justice system, safety and security within the U.S. and abroad, the domestic economy, international business trade, arts/humanities funding, and scientific research funding.

This event will feature perspectives from students, faculty, staff and alumni.

Sponsored by the Graduate Student Council

Schedule

10:00 a.m.

Rise Up!
University Center Atrium

Maggie Lally, Associate Professor, Department of Theatre; Cindy Maguire, Acting Associate Dean, College of Arts and Sciences; and Kathleen Watchorn, Coordinator of Projects and Programs, Division of Student Affairs

Rise Up! is a socially engaged artwork exhibition that involves the Adelphi community in debate, collaboration and social interaction through the arts. Beginning with the Ghostlight Project in January 2017, we continue to explore and play with the various visions and voices of our community. Please join us in this work by expressing your view of the first 100 days of this new administration. 

11:00 a.m.

Immigration and Refugee
University Center Room 211

Cristino Chavez, School of Social Work Graduate Student

This presentation will focus on the issue of immigration and refugee migration in the United States. Recent administrative actions involving travel bans and immigration law enforcement against undocumented individuals have sparked fear among many families. This presentation will touch base on the process of immigration, terminology used to classify immigration status, recent increase in ICE enforcement, and knowing your rights.

Is Implicit Bias Real, and Does It Really Have an Impact on Policy and the Way We Perceive People?
University Center Room 201

Natasha Saini, School of Social Work Graduate Assistant, and Devin Thornburg, Professor, Ruth S. Ammon School of Education

This discussion will explore the validity of implicit bias and how that forms the way we judge people, the way we are judged, and the way it influences policy. Examples will be drawn from the criminal justice system, social services and our own campus.

LGBTQIA Rights in the Current Moment
University Center Room 212

Moderated by Carol Sussal, Associate Professor, School of Social Work and Chair of LGBTQ and Allies.
Panel: Carol Lucas, Director, Counseling and Support Services; Ellen Diamond, LCSW, Adelphi University alumna; Rev. Michael Delaney, Protestant Chaplain for Adelphi; Godfrey Greg, Clinical Associate Professor, School of Social Work; Geoffrey Ream, Associate Professor, School of Social Work


This session discusses the recent executive orders and direction of the current administration as it relates to the ongoing effort to secure the rights of LGBTIA people in this country. The local efforts of the University are also addressed and discussed.

11:45 a.m.

We Are U.S. (Soliloquies)
University Center Room 202

Maggie Lally, Associate Professor, and Students, Department of Theatre

We Are U.S. is a performance piece written by the freshman acting class. The personal and thoughtful reactions to national issues raised in this new administration are meant as a springboard for dialogue among people of their generation.

12:00 p.m.

Policy Reforms and Possible Implications for Public Health
University Center Room 313

Moderated by Kenneth Rondello, Clinical Associate Professor, College of Nursing and Public Health
Abigail Seide, Natalie Madray, Alexa Kaplan, Avion Henry and Lentz Lefevre College of Nursing and Public Health Students

A discussion-based workshop on topics affecting public health lead by Master of Public Health students. The topics will include the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and environmental policies, repealing the Affordable Care Act, the American Health Act and more.

How Fake News Is Affecting the U.S. System
University Center Room 212

Anmol Kumar, Willumstad School of Business Student, and John Drew, Assistant Professor, Department of Communications

The impact of “fake news” as a particular form of narrative emerging out of the past (e.g., “yellow journalism”) on the current economic and social systems in the United States are explored in this session with an eye toward prevention and informing the public.

Non-Profits in the Current Moment: Planned Parenthood
University Center Room 201

Nidhi Duggal, Levermore Global Scholars Student and Karla Bradley, Shayne Larkin and Julianna Claase ’15, Planned Parenthood

The current policies with regard to funding for non-profits have been challenging, and Planned Parenthood is a particular example of the challenges faced. This workshop will explore the organization’s mission, its current work and the ways in which it is addressing the needs of the community in the current political climate.

In the Middle: Trump’s First 100 Days vs. An Immigrant’s First 100 Days in an Immigration Detention Center
University Center Room 211

Bernadette Marson, School of Social Work

For most, the American Dream is for anyone who can come to the United States and become whatever they want to be. For one immigrant woman, she lived the American Dream for 27 years, escaping a country that is now in terrible shape. Over the years, she traveled in at out of the United States, re-entering without any problems, until that horrific Wednesday in January when she was returning to the place she called home. Her encounter with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) left her ‘in the middle” and her family in despair. Though she is not a threat, she is nearing her first 100 days in an immigration detention center. This discussion explores the latest changes in immigration reform and a woman who is caught in the middle. It will address President Trump’s pledge to crack down on unauthorized immigration, immigration detention centers and alternatives to immigration detention centers.

12:30 p.m.

White and Black: Political Cartoons from Palestine
University Center Room 203

Reem Khamis-Dakwar, Associate Professor, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Ruth S. Ammon School of Education, and Deborah Little, Associate Professor, Sociology
Co-Sponsored by the Collaboration Project

Mohammad Sabaaneh is a Palestinian cartoonist and he will be speaking about his forthcoming book entitled White and Black: Political Cartoons from Palestine. Mohammad is known for his black-and-white sketches that depict the tough subjects that confront Palestinians, including Israel’s everyday injustices in the West Bank and Gaza, and the experiences of the many Palestinian political prisoners being held in Israel. He was often censored by the Palestinian authority for his cartoons, and jailed by Israel.

1:00 p.m.

Be the Voice: Community Activism and Advocacy 
University Center Room 212

Cristino Chavez, School of Social Work Graduate Student

This presentation will focus on the community advocacy and activism. Current administrative actions have greatly impacted marginalized communities across the country, as well as bring awareness to the importance of community advocacy and activism. This presentation will touch base on the constructs of community advocacy within the United States, as well as the key skills on how to become an effective advocate.

Being an Ally for All Students
University Center Room 211

Diana Feige, Clinical Associate Professor, and Luda Bryzzheva, Associate Professor, Ruth S. Ammon School of Education; with Navpreet Gill, Immigration Attorney; Nelson Melgar of the Northshore Latino Civic Association; Helen Dorado Assessi of Herstory and the Long Beach Latino Civic Association

This conversation and information session will be guided by the following questions: What we are doing to protect undocumented immigrants within the current state of law; what we are doing to address the needs of international community (students and faculty), and how we communicate and connect with surrounding communities and their resources to communicate a sense of home to affected populations?

Financial Markets in the Time of Trump
University Center Room 313

Pratik Nigam, Robert B. Willumstad School of Business Graduate Student, and Michael Driscoll, Clinical Assistant Professor, School of Business 

This session will address the impact of the current administration and its policies on financial markets, both in the United States and globally. Future trends will be addressed, as well.

1:30 p.m.

Wake Up, Everybody (Musical Works)

University Center Room 201

Dori-Jo Gutierrez, Department of Music Student, and Sonia Minutella, Coordinator of Advisement, Ruth S. Ammon School of Education

2:00 p.m.

Beauty, Love and Justice
University Center Room 203

Christine Passarella, M.A. ’95, Ruth S. Ammon School of Education/Kids for Coltrane
Co-Sponsored by Cristina Zaccarini, Associate Professor, department of History 

This will be presented by educator Christine Passarella, founder of Kids for Coltrane. The work focuses on fighting for the rights of each individual child, as we are uplifted by the music and spirit of John Coltrane. Passarella uses jazz to teach children about American history, equality, character education and the arts. Such a program helps children develop a foundation from which to become innovative and vital global citizens.


For more information, please contact:

Devin Thornburg
e – thornburg@adelphi.edu

 
Tagged: College of Arts and Sciences, Robert B. Willumstad School of Business, Ruth S. Ammon School of Education, Levermore Global Scholars, College of Nursing and Public Health, School of Social Work, Collaboration Project, Student Affairs, Multicultural Affairs, African, Black and Caribbean Studies, Asian Studies, Criminal Justice, Department of Art and Art History, Department of Communications, Department of Dance, Department of History, Department of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures, Department of Music, Department of Philosophy, Department of Political Science, Department of Sociology, Department of Theatre, International Studies, Peace Studies Program, Office of International Student Services, Global, Curriculum and Instruction, Communication Sciences and Disorders, Adelphi Votes, Racial Justice Matters, Diversity
 
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