March 26, 2015
9:00 a.m.–3:00 p.m.


Thomas Dixon Lovely Ballroom
Ruth S. Harley University Center
Tagged: Adelphi University, Collaboration Project, The Changing Nature of War and Peace

Symposium on the Changing Nature of War and Peace

Event, Campus Event, Lecture Series

Morning Panels on “The Changing Means of Waging War”

9:25-10:40 a.m. – Individual Presentations
10:50-11:35 a.m. – Roundtable Discussion

The topic will be targeted killings by means of drones. Each scholar will address this novel and controversial means of fighting war from the standpoints of their own disciplines: International Law, Ethics, and International Relations respectively. Afterward, they will engage with one another and the audience in an open roundtable discussion of the topic. The two morning sessions will feature the following three scholars:

Adil Haque—Rutgers School of Law

Professor Adil Haque is an expert in the International Law of War and its moral underpinnings. He has numerous publications on the justice and laws of armed conflict and he is currently writing a book on the moral foundations of the law of armed conflict for Oxford University Press.                                

Jeff McMahan—Oxford University

Professor Jeff McMahan is the leading ethicist of war and armed conflict today. He has published extensively on the topic of war and has two influential books, Killing in War (Oxford Univ. Press, 2009) and The Ethics of Killing: Problems at the Margins of Life (Oxford Univ. Press, 2002). In addition, Professor McMahan has published several Op-Ed articles in The New York Times, The Huffington Post, and al-Jazeera America.

Daniel Brunstetter—University of California Irvine

Professor Daniel Brunstetter has written widely on the use of drones and targeted killings. He is currently writing a book on “ways in which US presidents have understood and implemented the ethical principles of the just war.” 

Afternoon Panels on “Confronting Peace”

12:15-1:30 p.m. – Individual Presentations
1:40-2:55 p.m. – Roundtable Discussion

Peace has been elusive throughout human history—the annals indicate that war characterizes much of human condition. Considerable attention is paid to the causes and conduct of large scale human conflict, but humanity is also inspired by visions of a more just, humane and peaceful world where the devastation of war is truly history. But what does peace, especially sustainable peace, look like? The afternoon panels examine systemic and localized peacebuilding as well as the challenges to peace through new sources of conflict and instability. These panels feature:

Séverinne Autesserre—Barnard College

Professor Séverinne Autesserre is the author of Peaceland – Conflict Resolution and the Everyday Politics of International Intervention (Cambridge, 2014) and The Trouble with the Congo: Local Violence and the Failure of International Peacebuilding (Cambridge, 2010). She has published articles in International Organization, International Peacekeeping and African Affairs. She was awarded 2011 Chadwick Alger Prize from the International Studies Association for the best book on international organizations and multilateralism and the 2012 Grawemeyer Award for Ideas Improving World Order.

Joshua S. Goldstein– American University

Professor Joshua S. Goldstein is an interdisciplinary scholar of war, peace, and international relations, and author of Winning the War on War: The Decline of Armed Conflict Worldwide (Dutton/Penguin, 2011), The Real Price of War (NYU, 2004), and War and Gender: How Gender Shapes the War System and Vice Versa (Cambridge, 2001). Goldstein has published articles in Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, American Political Science Review, Journal of Conflict Resolution, and International Studies Quarterly, among others, and Op Ed pieces in The New York Times, Washington Post, and elsewhere.

Dominic Rushe—The Guardian Newspaper

Mr. Dominic Rushe is the US business editor for The Guardian newspaper. He was part of the Pulitzer Prize-winning team that first reported Snowden’s revelations, for which he was also awarded the Investigative Reporters and Editors medal. Mr. Rushe first came to the US to report on the aftermath of 9/11 for the London Sunday Times and has been with The Guardian for five years. His current interest is on the largely hidden conflicts of cyber-space and their implications for privacy.

2:30-3:00 p.m. – Performance by the Mineola High School Choir: Songs of Unity and Protest

Part of the Changing Nature of War and Peace initiative.
Tagged: Adelphi University, Collaboration Project, The Changing Nature of War and Peace
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